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Showing posts from April, 2009

Personal Web Discovery (aka Webfinger)

There's a particular discovery problem for open and distributed protocols such as OpenID, OAuth, Portable Contacts, Activity Streams, and OpenSocial.  It seems like a trivial problem, but it's one of the stumbling blocks that slows mass adoption.  We need to fix it.  So first, I'm going to name it:

The Personal Web Discovery Problem:  Given a person, how do I find out what services that person uses?
This does sound trivial, doesn't it?  And it is easy as long as you're service-centric; if you're building on top of social network X, there is no discovery problem, or at least only a trivial one that can be solved with proprietary APIs.  But what if you want to build on top of X,Y, and Z?  Well, you write code to make the user log in to each one so you can call those proprietary APIs... which means the user has to tell you their identity (and probably password) on each one... and the user has already clicked the Back button because this is complicated and annoying.

Positive Feedback in Social Search

One suggestion from today's social search session at #swfoo was to send queries off to both search engines and your friends (e.g., "vacations in Venice").  A problem here is that many of your friends are incompetent about vacations in Venice, so sending them this both spams them and decreases results relevancy -- noise increases linearly with overall size of system.  This is why the good results that early adopters with 20K followers have with "what's the best pizza in Sebastopol" aren't scalable.
But, there's a nice solution to this I think.  As you do get results that are somewhat relevant from friends, you click through on their answers.  Your clicks tell the system that friend's answer was relevant in context, allowing it to learn which friends are competent in various fields.  Combine these results across everyone who is asking questions of the same friends to cancel out bias; you're left with a vector of weights for each person in the n…

Social Web Foo: Standards for Public Social Web

Small but useful #swfoo session.  My idea was to try to give public social data formats, protocols, and standards some quality time, since (a) privacy and ACLs introduce many difficult problems that eat up lots of discussion time; and (b) there are many key use cases that are totally public, and might be easily solvable if we remove the distraction of privacy controls. @niall, @dewitt, and @steveganz attended, but per Foo rules, I won't attribute specific quotes.
Examples of this include public blogs, update streams, and feeds; and public following/friending relationships.  Typically following (one way) seems to be more likely to be public than friending, for social reasons.
Some random notes:   Public content, once published, should be assumed to be "in the wild" everywhere, indefinitely, until the heat death of the universe.PubSubHubHub (prior session) is a great example of a proposed open standard for improving the performance of public social data.
Problem:  How does an …

Deep Thought at Social Web Foo

Not mine; these guys: