Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from April, 2006

Atom feed updates: Pagination

One of the hidden changes from last week's release is the support for Atom pagination.  This will potentially let tools browse of the entries in a blog, copy them, archive them, search them, etc.  Technically, this means we're supporting the link@rel="first", "last", "next", and "previous" relations.  Get the current feed and follow the "previous" links until you run out of data; then you've got all of the entries in a blog, in standard Atom format.  And, we're valid according to http://feedvalidator.org.  Let me know if you see any problems.

Tags: Web Bumper Stickers

Our new entry tagging secret beta stealth feature might be a little difficult to see since it doesn't work on IE yet, though Joe did a great job with screen shots.  (Joe: It's not much of a stealth feature if you tell everybody about it, is it?)

Tags are just labels that you can apply to your entries; since they're public, they're kind of like electronic bumper stickers.  If you use Firefox or Mozilla, you can play with them on beta.journals.aol.com/<your screen name>.  Otherwise, well, here's a little animation:



...and you can see the results below.  I have no idea what "stealth" is going to link to, since right now it just does a general web-wide tag search.  I think that's kind of fun, actually, but your mileage may vary.  We're looking at various ideas, including having the links go to a blog-specific search page (but perhaps with links off to the general web search to see what other people have chosen the same bumper stickers).  Also, we&…

Code, and other laws... (part 2)

In part 1I talked about the ideal world where feeds were all clearly licensed. Sonow I'll turn to the real world, and I'll be very US-centric becausethis article is quite long enough as it is. You might want to skip tothe happy fun summary at the bottom.

Millions of feeds aren't explicitly licensed.  Some can't be becausetheir generators don't allow for it.  For others, the owner doesn'tknow or care about licensing.  For unlicensed feeds, it's notreasonable to make the default assumption "nothing more than fair use"because there are millions of feeds out there whose owners want theircontent syndicated as-is (headline feeds with links back to content,for example).  On the other hand, if you assume anything more than fairuse, you also need to be prepared handle exceptions.  So how to do bothof these in a way that minimizes overhead and letsaggregation happen without lawyers while respecting copyright?

My take is that a reasonable default assumption is…

Buddy Updates for Blog Entries

Greg of aiminfo blogs about IM Triton release 1.2.37.2 : "Buddy Updates allow you to view changes or additions your buddies make to their away messages, message boards and profiles.  You will see a new icon next to the buddy in the buddy list when an update has happened: "You can grab the latest AIM Triton here.  What Greg doesn't mention is that this also works for blog entries made through Journals.  So if you use the latest AIM client, you'll be notified about your buddies' latest blog posts.  If you try it out, please let me (or Susan or Joe or John) know what you think.  This only works for public blogs, the ones that you can find through AOL or Google search in any case, but it does give you an up-to-the-minute picture of what's going on with your buddies.Oh, and we have an update for Journals going out tomorrow morning.  After it's complete, one nonobvious change is that you'll be able to see the list of Journals someone publishes by going to t…

Danah Boyd at AOL Mountain View

Danah Boyd just wrappedup a great talk about online social spaces here at AOL Mountain View(the podcast is up already).  She delivered information via firehose. Some random notes...

There were several reasons why Friendster faded, and some lessons.Conflictbetween the user community and the space creators (they wanted a datingsite, the users wanted to do a lot of other things).  Lesson:Listen to the community; be flexible; adjust the business plan whenneeded.Servers buckled under load when it got too popular.  Lesson:The technology has to work or people will lose patience and go to the competition.
When Friendster started to try to go mainstream beyond the earlyadopter clusters, new users couldn't find any friends on the site so itwasn't useful to them.  Lesson:  Network effects work inreverse too.  Start with small clusters and grow organically.
MySpace did a big thing right: When people started 'hacking' HTML intheir own spaces, the creators let it happen, then made it e…